Source code

Revision control

Other Tools

/* -*- Mode: C++; tab-width: 8; indent-tabs-mode: nil; c-basic-offset: 4 -*-
* vim: set ts=8 sts=4 et sw=4 tw=99:
* This Source Code Form is subject to the terms of the Mozilla Public
* License, v. 2.0. If a copy of the MPL was not distributed with this
* file, You can obtain one at http://mozilla.org/MPL/2.0/. */
#ifndef js_Promise_h
#define js_Promise_h
#include "mozilla/Attributes.h"
#include "jstypes.h"
#include "js/RootingAPI.h"
#include "js/TypeDecls.h"
#include "js/UniquePtr.h"
namespace JS {
class JS_PUBLIC_API AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption;
/**
* Abstract base class for an ECMAScript Job Queue:
*
* SpiderMonkey doesn't schedule Promise resolution jobs itself; instead, the
* embedding can provide an instance of this class SpiderMonkey can use to do
* that scheduling.
*
* The JavaScript shell includes a simple implementation adequate for running
* tests. Browsers need to augment job handling to meet their own additional
* requirements, so they can provide their own implementation.
*/
class JS_PUBLIC_API JobQueue {
public:
virtual ~JobQueue() = default;
/**
* Ask the embedding for the incumbent global.
*
* SpiderMonkey doesn't itself have a notion of incumbent globals as defined
* by the HTML spec, so we need the embedding to provide this. See
* dom/script/ScriptSettings.h for details.
*/
virtual JSObject* getIncumbentGlobal(JSContext* cx) = 0;
/**
* Enqueue a reaction job `job` for `promise`, which was allocated at
* `allocationSite`. Provide `incumbentGlobal` as the incumbent global for
* the reaction job's execution.
*/
virtual bool enqueuePromiseJob(JSContext* cx, JS::HandleObject promise,
JS::HandleObject job,
JS::HandleObject allocationSite,
JS::HandleObject incumbentGlobal) = 0;
/**
* Run all jobs in the queue. Running one job may enqueue others; continue to
* run jobs until the queue is empty.
*
* Calling this method at the wrong time can break the web. The HTML spec
* indicates exactly when the job queue should be drained (in HTML jargon,
* when it should "perform a microtask checkpoint"), and doing so at other
* times can incompatibly change the semantics of programs that use promises
* or other microtask-based features.
*
* This method is called only via AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption, used by
* the Debugger API implementation to ensure that the debuggee's job queue is
* protected from the debugger's own activity. See the comments on
* AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption.
*/
virtual void runJobs(JSContext* cx) = 0;
/**
* Return true if the job queue is empty, false otherwise.
*/
virtual bool empty() const = 0;
protected:
friend class AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption;
/**
* A saved job queue, represented however the JobQueue implementation pleases.
* Use AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption rather than trying to construct one of
* these directly; see documentation there.
*
* Destructing an instance of this class should assert that the current queue
* is empty, and then restore the queue the instance captured.
*/
class SavedJobQueue {
public:
virtual ~SavedJobQueue() = default;
};
/**
* Capture this JobQueue's current job queue as a SavedJobQueue and return it,
* leaving the JobQueue's job queue empty. Destroying the returned object
* should assert that this JobQueue's current job queue is empty, and restore
* the original queue.
*
* On OOM, this should call JS_ReportOutOfMemory on the given JSContext,
* and return a null UniquePtr.
*/
virtual js::UniquePtr<SavedJobQueue> saveJobQueue(JSContext*) = 0;
};
/**
* Tell SpiderMonkey to use `queue` to schedule promise reactions.
*
* SpiderMonkey does not take ownership of the queue; it is the embedding's
* responsibility to clean it up after the runtime is destroyed.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void SetJobQueue(JSContext* cx, JobQueue* queue);
/**
* [SMDOC] Protecting the debuggee's job/microtask queue from debugger activity.
*
* When the JavaScript debugger interrupts the execution of some debuggee code
* (for a breakpoint, for example), the debuggee's execution must be paused
* while the developer takes time to look at it. During this interruption, other
* tabs should remain active and usable. If the debuggee shares a main thread
* with non-debuggee tabs, that means that the thread will have to process
* non-debuggee HTML tasks and microtasks as usual, even as the debuggee's are
* on hold until the debugger lets it continue execution. (Letting debuggee
* microtasks run during the interruption would mean that, from the debuggee's
* point of view, their side effects would take place wherever the breakpoint
* was set - in general, not a place other code should ever run, and a violation
* of the run-to-completion rule.)
*
* This means that, even though the timing and ordering of microtasks is
* carefully specified by the standard - and important to preserve for
* compatibility and predictability - debugger use may, correctly, have the
* effect of reordering microtasks. During the interruption, microtasks enqueued
* by non-debuggee tabs must run immediately alongside their HTML tasks as
* usual, whereas any debuggee microtasks that were in the queue when the
* interruption began must wait for the debuggee to be continued - and thus run
* after microtasks enqueued after they were.
*
* Fortunately, this reordering is visible only at the global level: when
* implemented correctly, it is not detectable by an individual debuggee. Note
* that a debuggee should generally be a complete unit of similar-origin related
* browsing contexts. Since non-debuggee activity falls outside that unit, it
* should never be visible to the debuggee (except via mechanisms that are
* already asynchronous, like events), so the debuggee should be unable to
* detect non-debuggee microtasks running when they normally would not. As long
* as behavior *visible to the debuggee* is unaffected by the interruption, we
* have respected the spirit of the rule.
*
* Of course, even as we accept the general principle that interrupting the
* debuggee should have as little detectable effect as possible, we still permit
* the developer to do things like evaluate expressions at the console that have
* arbitrary effects on the debuggee's state—effects that could never occur
* naturally at that point in the program. But since these are explicitly
* requested by the developer, who presumably knows what they're doing, we
* support this as best we can. If the developer evaluates an expression in the
* console that resolves a promise, it seems most natural for the promise's
* reaction microtasks to run immediately, within the interruption. This is an
* 'unnatural' time for the microtasks to run, but no more unnatural than the
* evaluation that triggered them.
*
* So the overall behavior we need is as follows:
*
* - When the debugger interrupts a debuggee, the debuggee's microtask queue
* must be saved.
*
* - When debuggee execution resumes, the debuggee's microtask queue must be
* restored exactly as it was when the interruption occurred.
*
* - Non-debuggee task and microtask execution must take place normally during
* the interruption.
*
* Since each HTML task begins with an empty microtask queue, and it should not
* be possible for a task to mix debuggee and non-debuggee code, interrupting a
* debuggee should always find a microtask queue containing exclusively debuggee
* microtasks, if any. So saving and restoring the microtask queue should affect
* only the debuggee, not any non-debuggee content.
*
* AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption
* --------------------------------
*
* AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption is an RAII class, meant for use by the
* Debugger API implementation, that takes care of saving and restoring the
* queue.
*
* Constructing and initializing an instance of AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption
* sets aside the given JSContext's job queue, leaving the JSContext's queue
* empty. When the AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption instance is destroyed, it
* asserts that the JSContext's current job queue (holding jobs enqueued while
* the AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption was alive) is empty, and restores the
* saved queue to the JSContext.
*
* Since the Debugger API's behavior is up to us, we can specify that Debugger
* hooks begin execution with an empty job queue, and that we drain the queue
* after each hook function has run. This drain will be visible to debugger
* hooks, and makes hook calls resemble HTML tasks, with their own automatic
* microtask checkpoint. But, the drain will be invisible to the debuggee, as
* its queue is preserved across the hook invocation.
*
* To protect the debuggee's job queue, Debugger takes care to invoke callback
* functions only within the scope of an AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption
* instance.
*
* Why not let the hook functions themselves take care of this?
* ------------------------------------------------------------
*
* Certainly, we could leave responsibility for saving and restoring the job
* queue to the Debugger hook functions themselves.
*
* In fact, early versions of this change tried making the devtools server save
* and restore the queue explicitly, but because hooks are set and changed in
* numerous places, it was hard to be confident that every case had been
* covered, and it seemed that future changes could easily introduce new holes.
*
* Later versions of this change modified the accessor properties on the
* Debugger objects' prototypes to automatically protect the job queue when
* calling hooks, but the effect was essentially a monkeypatch applied to an API
* we defined and control, which doesn't make sense.
*
* In the end, since promises have become such a pervasive part of JavaScript
* programming, almost any imaginable use of Debugger would need to provide some
* kind of protection for the debuggee's job queue, so it makes sense to simply
* handle it once, carefully, in the implementation of Debugger itself.
*/
class MOZ_RAII JS_PUBLIC_API AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption {
public:
explicit AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption();
~AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption();
bool init(JSContext* cx);
bool initialized() const { return !!saved; }
/**
* Drain the job queue. (In HTML terminology, perform a microtask checkpoint.)
*
* To make Debugger hook calls more like HTML tasks or ECMAScript jobs,
* Debugger promises that each hook begins execution with a clean microtask
* queue, and that a microtask checkpoint (queue drain) takes place after each
* hook returns, successfully or otherwise.
*
* To ensure these debugger-introduced microtask checkpoints serve only the
* hook's microtasks, and never affect the debuggee's, the Debugger API
* implementation uses only this method to perform the checkpoints, thereby
* statically ensuring that an AutoDebuggerJobQueueInterruption is in scope to
* protect the debuggee.
*
* SavedJobQueue implementations are required to assert that the queue is
* empty before restoring the debuggee's queue. If the Debugger API ever fails
* to perform a microtask checkpoint after calling a hook, that assertion will
* fail, catching the mistake.
*/
void runJobs();
private:
JSContext* cx;
js::UniquePtr<JobQueue::SavedJobQueue> saved;
};
enum class PromiseRejectionHandlingState { Unhandled, Handled };
typedef void (*PromiseRejectionTrackerCallback)(
JSContext* cx, bool mutedErrors, JS::HandleObject promise,
JS::PromiseRejectionHandlingState state, void* data);
/**
* Sets the callback that's invoked whenever a Promise is rejected without
* a rejection handler, and when a Promise that was previously rejected
* without a handler gets a handler attached.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void SetPromiseRejectionTrackerCallback(
JSContext* cx, PromiseRejectionTrackerCallback callback,
void* data = nullptr);
/**
* Inform the runtime that the job queue is empty and the embedding is going to
* execute its last promise job. The runtime may now choose to skip creating
* promise jobs for asynchronous execution and instead continue execution
* synchronously. More specifically, this optimization is used to skip the
* standard job queuing behavior for `await` operations in async functions.
*
* This function may be called before executing the last job in the job queue.
* When it was called, JobQueueMayNotBeEmpty must be called in order to restore
* the default job queuing behavior before the embedding enqueues its next job
* into the job queue.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void JobQueueIsEmpty(JSContext* cx);
/**
* Inform the runtime that job queue is no longer empty. The runtime can now no
* longer skip creating promise jobs for asynchronous execution, because
* pending jobs in the job queue must be executed first to preserve the FIFO
* (first in - first out) property of the queue. This effectively undoes
* JobQueueIsEmpty and re-enables the standard job queuing behavior.
*
* This function must be called whenever enqueuing a job to the job queue when
* JobQueueIsEmpty was called previously.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void JobQueueMayNotBeEmpty(JSContext* cx);
/**
* Returns a new instance of the Promise builtin class in the current
* compartment, with the right slot layout.
*
* The `executor` can be a `nullptr`. In that case, the only way to resolve or
* reject the returned promise is via the `JS::ResolvePromise` and
* `JS::RejectPromise` JSAPI functions.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* NewPromiseObject(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject executor);
/**
* Returns true if the given object is an unwrapped PromiseObject, false
* otherwise.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool IsPromiseObject(JS::HandleObject obj);
/**
* Returns the current compartment's original Promise constructor.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* GetPromiseConstructor(JSContext* cx);
/**
* Returns the current compartment's original Promise.prototype.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* GetPromisePrototype(JSContext* cx);
// Keep this in sync with the PROMISE_STATE defines in SelfHostingDefines.h.
enum class PromiseState { Pending, Fulfilled, Rejected };
/**
* Returns the given Promise's state as a JS::PromiseState enum value.
*
* Returns JS::PromiseState::Pending if the given object is a wrapper that
* can't safely be unwrapped.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API PromiseState GetPromiseState(JS::HandleObject promise);
/**
* Returns the given Promise's process-unique ID.
*/
JS_PUBLIC_API uint64_t GetPromiseID(JS::HandleObject promise);
/**
* Returns the given Promise's result: either the resolution value for
* fulfilled promises, or the rejection reason for rejected ones.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JS::Value GetPromiseResult(JS::HandleObject promise);
/**
* Returns whether the given promise's rejection is already handled or not.
*
* The caller must check the given promise is rejected before checking it's
* handled or not.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool GetPromiseIsHandled(JS::HandleObject promise);
/*
* Given a settled (i.e. fulfilled or rejected, not pending) promise, sets
* |promise.[[PromiseIsHandled]]| to true and removes it from the list of
* unhandled rejected promises.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void SetSettledPromiseIsHandled(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promise);
/**
* Returns a js::SavedFrame linked list of the stack that lead to the given
* Promise's allocation.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* GetPromiseAllocationSite(
JS::HandleObject promise);
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* GetPromiseResolutionSite(
JS::HandleObject promise);
#ifdef DEBUG
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void DumpPromiseAllocationSite(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promise);
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void DumpPromiseResolutionSite(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promise);
#endif
/**
* Calls the current compartment's original Promise.resolve on the original
* Promise constructor, with `resolutionValue` passed as an argument.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* CallOriginalPromiseResolve(
JSContext* cx, JS::HandleValue resolutionValue);
/**
* Calls the current compartment's original Promise.reject on the original
* Promise constructor, with `resolutionValue` passed as an argument.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* CallOriginalPromiseReject(
JSContext* cx, JS::HandleValue rejectionValue);
/**
* Resolves the given Promise with the given `resolutionValue`.
*
* Calls the `resolve` function that was passed to the executor function when
* the Promise was created.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool ResolvePromise(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promiseObj,
JS::HandleValue resolutionValue);
/**
* Rejects the given `promise` with the given `rejectionValue`.
*
* Calls the `reject` function that was passed to the executor function when
* the Promise was created.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool RejectPromise(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promiseObj,
JS::HandleValue rejectionValue);
/**
* Create a Promise with the given fulfill/reject handlers, that will be
* fulfilled/rejected with the value/reason that the promise `promise` is
* fulfilled/rejected with.
*
* This function basically acts like `promise.then(onFulfilled, onRejected)`,
* except that its behavior is unaffected by changes to `Promise`,
* `Promise[Symbol.species]`, `Promise.prototype.then`, `promise.constructor`,
* `promise.then`, and so on.
*
* This function throws if `promise` is not a Promise from this or another
* realm.
*
* This function will assert if `onFulfilled` or `onRejected` is non-null and
* also not IsCallable.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* CallOriginalPromiseThen(
JSContext* cx, JS::HandleObject promise, JS::HandleObject onFulfilled,
JS::HandleObject onRejected);
/**
* Unforgeable, optimized version of the JS builtin Promise.prototype.then.
*
* Takes a Promise instance and nullable `onFulfilled`/`onRejected` callables to
* enqueue as reactions for that promise. In contrast to Promise.prototype.then,
* this doesn't create and return a new Promise instance.
*
* Throws a TypeError if `promise` isn't a Promise (or possibly a different
* error if it's a security wrapper or dead object proxy).
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool AddPromiseReactions(JSContext* cx,
JS::HandleObject promise,
JS::HandleObject onFulfilled,
JS::HandleObject onRejected);
/**
* Unforgeable, optimized version of the JS builtin Promise.prototype.then.
*
* Takes a Promise instance and nullable `onFulfilled`/`onRejected` callables to
* enqueue as reactions for that promise. In contrast to Promise.prototype.then,
* this doesn't create and return a new Promise instance.
*
* Throws a TypeError if `promise` isn't a Promise (or possibly a different
* error if it's a security wrapper or dead object proxy).
*
* If `onRejected` is null and `promise` is rejected, this function -- unlike
* the function above -- will not report an unhandled rejection.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool AddPromiseReactionsIgnoringUnhandledRejection(
JSContext* cx, JS::HandleObject promise, JS::HandleObject onFulfilled,
JS::HandleObject onRejected);
// This enum specifies whether a promise is expected to keep track of
// information that is useful for embedders to implement user activation
// behavior handling as specified in the HTML spec:
// By default, promises created by SpiderMonkey do not make any attempt to keep
// track of information about whether an activation behavior was being processed
// when the original promise in a promise chain was created. If the embedder
// sets either of the HadUserInteractionAtCreation or
// DidntHaveUserInteractionAtCreation flags on a promise after creating it,
// SpiderMonkey will propagate that flag to newly created promises when
// processing Promise#then and will make it possible to query this flag off of a
// promise further down the chain later using the
// GetPromiseUserInputEventHandlingState() API.
enum class PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState {
// Don't keep track of this state (default for all promises)
DontCare,
// Keep track of this state, the original promise in the chain was created
// while an activation behavior was being processed.
HadUserInteractionAtCreation,
// Keep track of this state, the original promise in the chain was created
// while an activation behavior was not being processed.
DidntHaveUserInteractionAtCreation
};
/**
* Returns the given Promise's activation behavior state flag per above as a
* JS::PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState value. All promises are created with
* the DontCare state by default.
*
* Returns JS::PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState::DontCare if the given object
* is a wrapper that can't safely be unwrapped.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState
GetPromiseUserInputEventHandlingState(JS::HandleObject promise);
/**
* Sets the given Promise's activation behavior state flag per above as a
* JS::PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState value.
*
* Returns false if the given object is a wrapper that can't safely be
* unwrapped.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API bool SetPromiseUserInputEventHandlingState(
JS::HandleObject promise, JS::PromiseUserInputEventHandlingState state);
/**
* Unforgeable version of the JS builtin Promise.all.
*
* Takes a HandleObjectVector of Promise objects and returns a promise that's
* resolved with an array of resolution values when all those promises have
* been resolved, or rejected with the rejection value of the first rejected
* promise.
*
* Asserts that all objects in the `promises` vector are, maybe wrapped,
* instances of `Promise` or a subclass of `Promise`.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API JSObject* GetWaitForAllPromise(
JSContext* cx, JS::HandleObjectVector promises);
/**
* The Dispatchable interface allows the embedding to call SpiderMonkey
* on a JSContext thread when requested via DispatchToEventLoopCallback.
*/
class JS_PUBLIC_API Dispatchable {
protected:
// Dispatchables are created and destroyed by SpiderMonkey.
Dispatchable() = default;
virtual ~Dispatchable() = default;
public:
// ShuttingDown indicates that SpiderMonkey should abort async tasks to
// expedite shutdown.
enum MaybeShuttingDown { NotShuttingDown, ShuttingDown };
// Called by the embedding after DispatchToEventLoopCallback succeeds.
virtual void run(JSContext* cx, MaybeShuttingDown maybeShuttingDown) = 0;
};
/**
* Callback to dispatch a JS::Dispatchable to a JSContext's thread's event loop.
*
* The DispatchToEventLoopCallback set on a particular JSContext must accept
* JS::Dispatchable instances and arrange for their `run` methods to be called
* eventually on the JSContext's thread. This is used for cross-thread dispatch,
* so the callback itself must be safe to call from any thread.
*
* If the callback returns `true`, it must eventually run the given
* Dispatchable; otherwise, SpiderMonkey may leak memory or hang.
*
* The callback may return `false` to indicate that the JSContext's thread is
* shutting down and is no longer accepting runnables. Shutting down is a
* one-way transition: once the callback has rejected a runnable, it must reject
* all subsequently submitted runnables as well.
*
* To establish a DispatchToEventLoopCallback, the embedding may either call
* InitDispatchToEventLoop to provide its own, or call js::UseInternalJobQueues
* to select a default implementation built into SpiderMonkey. This latter
* depends on the embedding to call js::RunJobs on the JavaScript thread to
* process queued Dispatchables at appropriate times.
*/
typedef bool (*DispatchToEventLoopCallback)(void* closure,
Dispatchable* dispatchable);
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void InitDispatchToEventLoop(
JSContext* cx, DispatchToEventLoopCallback callback, void* closure);
/**
* When a JSRuntime is destroyed it implicitly cancels all async tasks in
* progress, releasing any roots held by the task. However, this is not soon
* enough for cycle collection, which needs to have roots dropped earlier so
* that the cycle collector can transitively remove roots for a future GC. For
* these and other cases, the set of pending async tasks can be canceled
* with this call earlier than JSRuntime destruction.
*/
extern JS_PUBLIC_API void ShutdownAsyncTasks(JSContext* cx);
} // namespace JS
#endif // js_Promise_h